The following is the outline text from the presentation slides and may be used with attribution.


Track It! Documenting Instructional Impact

University of South Carolina-School of Library and Information Science


Gerry Solomon

Dr. Donna Shannon

Dr. Karen Gavigan





“I do not believe the majority of school librarians have yet recognized the need for individual accountability for their programs - communicating effectively with teachers, administrators, and parents how their work directly supports school goals and why information literacy is more important than ever in the digital age. The fight to stem the decline of school library positions will be fought one building, one district at a time.” Doug Johnson


Why is it important to document impact on teaching and learning?

— To inform our practice

— To demonstrate the library program's contribution to student learning and teacher effectiveness with evidence

— To advocate for the library program

— Evidence-based Practice

“By emphasizing outcomes, EBP shifts the focus from articulating what school librarians do to what students achieve. Accordingly, EBP validates that quality learning outcomes can be achieved through the school library and that the school librarian is an important instructional partner.”

“The school library media program is guided by regular assessment of student learning to ensure the program is meeting its goals.”

(Empowering learners: Guidelines, 2009)


What Informs Instruction?

— Standards

— Skills Charts

— Learning Outcomes

— Information literacy models

— Benchmarks

— Gathering Evidence Involves:


Output Measures

— Collaborative Planning Notes

— Collaborative units

— Lesson Plans

— Checklists of skills covered for each class/grade level

Output Measures

— collaborative planning notes

— lesson plans

— collaborative units with differentiation strategies

— skills taught by class


Gathering Evidence: Monitoring Progress in Learning Outcomes

“A learning outcome is one sentence that indicates what students should represent, demonstrate, or produce as a result of what they learn.”

Maki, Peggy (2004). Assessing for learning: building a sustainable commitment across the institution.


Assessment OF Learning

— Summative, judgmental

— Involves grading

— Places responsibility on instructor

— Focuses on programmatic and system accountability

— Examples: high stakes testing, unit tests, culminating products

— Collaboration: 6th grade plant research project

6th graders scores on the SC PASS science test related to plants showed an increase in test scores from 6th graders the previous year.

SL:

taught steps of Big 6 process;

provided detailed research packet;

provided guidance


How to Monitor Learning Growth

— Formative, ongoing, reflective
Student and instructor as partners
Pre-assessment


Assessing Learning: The Missing Piece in Instruction? (Harada and Yoshina)

— Identify the learning target.

— Develop criteria for assessment.

— Select an assessment tool.

— Design a performance task.

— Use the assessment results to improve instruction.


Example: Dear Mr. K

We fownd a bug on the sidwok at or school. It is red and black. It has 2 antena and small sqares on the back. Kan you hlp us? We want to no if this bug is dangris and if it pichas and what it can do. Can you tell us its name too?

Mrs. W’s class

— Chart 1: What we know about inquiring (pre)

— Chart 2: What we know about inquiring (post)


— Learning Logs Wiki

— Google Images: Learning Logs


Survey Question Focus – Dr. Ross Todd, Evidence-Based Practice

  1. How helpful the school library is with getting information you need
  2. How helpful the school library is with using the information to complete your school work (lL skills)
  3. How helpful the school library is with your school work in general (knowledge building, knowledge outcomes)
  4. How helpful the school library is with using computers in the library, at school, and at home
  5. How helpful the school library is to you with your general reading interests
  6. How helpful the school library is to you when you are not at school (independent learning)
  7. General school aspects –Academic Achievement

—


— How Will I…

Develop a long-range plan for assessing and documenting the impact of my instructional program?

Identify workable assessment strategies;

Identify what activities will be assessed and when;

Gather and organize evidence;

Present/report evidence

—
Reporting As Advocacy

  • — Evidence Folders/Portfolios
  • — Summary Reports
  • — Charting Your Course

"To make our programs count and to be accountable, we need to take a hard look at the research findings, assess where we are and decide what we need to do.. We can’t wait for someone else to do it for us. We have the academic proof now let’s build the grassroots proof. We need to set some achievable goals, and develop an action plan."

Making Library Programs Count: Where’s the Evidence? School Libraries in Canada, Koechlin and Zwaan 2003


Advice

— Start where you are

— Track resources and services

— Build partnerships with faculty

— Increase collaborations

— Integrate ICT skills into units of study

— With teachers tackle assessments – develop long-range plan


Possible contents of evidence folder

  • — Link library’s mission with school’s mission statement.
  • — Connect with school’s learning priorities.
  • — Select samples of instruction to align with school’s priorities.
  • — Possible contents of evidence folder
  • — Provide examples of student work for lessons included.
  • — Display compiled assessment data for lessons selected.
  • — Include samples of student and instructor reflections about progress and improvements.

Algonquin Middle School (NY) Quarterly Reports


Knowledge Quest: 30 Second Thought Leadership (Mar/Apr 2012 Issue)

Q: What is the key to successful coteaching?

—
What Is Your Impact?

“School library marketing has to begin and end with impact. It has to be about what we do for our kids, our teachers, our communities and why it's important. It has to be about outcomes and the message that 'we're all in this together' or, put another way, that we care just as much about student success as any other teacher in the building." Jennifer LaGarde

—


Gerry Solomon

gsolomon@mailbox.sc.edu

Dr. Donna Shannon dshannon@mailbox.sc.edu

Dr. Karen Gavigan kgavigan@mailbox.sc.edu

—
Credits

Photos: Microsoft Image Gallery (unless otherwise indicated)

— American Association of School Librarians. (2012, March-April). 30 second thought leadership: Insights from the school library community. Retrieved http://www.ala.org/aasl/aaslpubsandjournals/knowledgequest/aboutkq/30second

— Bullington, Fran. "Advocacy: Monthly Reports." Informania. N.p., 6 November 2010. Web. 19 Jun. 2013. <http://informania.wordpress.com/2010/11/06/>.

— Ekstrom, R. (Producer). (2012). Algonquin middle school: Quarter 1 report 2011-2012. [Web Video]. Retrieved from http://animoto.com/play/X1hw2PN3KSFa9atIR9SPRw

— Ekstrom, R. (Producer). (2012). Algonquin middle school: Quarter 2 report 2011-2012. [Print Photo]. Retrieved from

— Hamilton, B. (2010, October 29). [Web log message]. Retrieved from http://theunquietlibrarian.wordpress.com/2010/10/29/assessment-and-metacognition-blogging-research-reflections/

— Harada, V. H., & Yoshina, J. M. (2006). Assessing learning: The missing piece in instruction?. School Library Monthly, 22(7), Retrieved from http://www.schoollibrarymonthly.com/articles/Harada2006v22n7p20.html

— Harada, V. H. (Creator). (2006). What is assessment? Why should library media specialists be involved? [Presentation].

— Harland, P. E. A. (2010). Plymouth regional high school library annual report. Retrieved from http://www.prhslibrary.com/reports/report0510.pdf

— Kachel, D. E. (2012, May-June). The annual report as an advocacy tool. School Library Monthly, XXVIII(8), 27-9.

— Kalmon, S., & Nassar, N. (2010). Collaborative planning organizer. Retrieved from http://www.cal-webs.org/files/41697872.doc

— Knight, Andrea. "Glenview Library Newsletter." Glenview Middle School, Feb. 2013. Web. 19 Jun 2013. <https://www.smore.com/qfhu>.

— LaGarde, J. (2013, May 22). [Web log message]. School library annual reports: Connecting the dots between your library and student learning. Retrieved from http://www.librarygirl.net/2013/05/school-library-annual-reports.html

— LaGarde, J. (2013, April 23). [Web log message]. School library marketing 101: It's about students not stuff. Retrieved from http://www.librarygirl.net/2013/04/school-library-marketing-101-its-about.html

— Langhorne, M. J., & Rehnke, D. (2011). Developing 21st century literacies: A k-12 school library curriculum blueprint with sample lessons. New York: Neal-Schuman Publishers.

— Library Research Service. (2013, February 272013, February 27). [Web log message]. Retrieved from http://www.lrs.org/news/2013/02/27/make-the-case-for-school-libraries-with-our-new-impact-studies-infographic/

— Loertscher, D., with Ross J Todd. (2003) "We boost achievement! Evidence-Based practice for school library media specialists." Salt Lake City: Hi Willow Research & Publishing.

— Ontario School Library Association. (2003). The teacher librarian's toolkit for evidence-based practice. Retrieved from http://www.accessola.com/osla/toolkit/home.html

— ALTEC, University of Kansas. ((2009)2009). Project based learning: Multimedia presentation. Retrieved from http://pblchecklist.4teachers.org/testing.php?idunique=3

— Todd, R. J. (Creator). (2011). Evidence-based practice: What is the fingerprint of your school library program on student learning in the 21st century? [Presentation].

— Todd, R. (2008, April 1). The evidence-based manifesto for school librarians. School Library Journal, Retrieved from http://www.schoollibraryjournal.com/article/CA6545434.html

— Victoria, C. D. ((2011)2011). Spring11ell: learning logs: Writing to learn. Retrieved from http://spring11ell.wikispaces.com/Learning Logs




—Doug Johnson
I do not believe the majority of school librarians have yet recognized the need for individual accountability for their programs - communicating effectively with teachers, administrators, and parents how their work directly supports school goals and why information literacy is more important than ever in the digital age.
The fight to stem the decline of school library positions will be fought one building, one district at a time.
—Why is it important to document impact on teaching and learning? —Why —To inform our practice ——To demonstrate the library program's contribution to student learning and teacher effectiveness with evidence——To advocate for the library program —Evidence-based Practice
“By emphasizing outcomes, EBP shifts the focus from articulating what school librarians do to what students achieve. Accordingly, EBP validates that quality learning outcomes can be achieved through the school library and that the school librarian is an important instructional partner.”
—
“The school library media program is guided by regular assessment of student learning to ensure the program is meeting its goals.”
(Empowering learners: Guidelines, 2009)

——————What Informs Instruction?
—Standards—Skills Charts—Learning Outcomes—Information literacy models———Benchmarks————Gathering Evidence Involves: —Output Measures —Collaborative Planning Notes—Collaborative units—Lesson Plans—Checklists of skills covered for each class/grade level——Output Measures —collaborative planning notes—lesson plans—collaborative units with differentiation strategies—skills taught by class—————Gathering Evidence: Monitoring Progress in Learning Outcomes
“A learning outcome is one sentence that indicates what students should represent, demonstrate, or produce as a result of what they learn.”
Maki, Peggy (2004). Assessing for learning: building a sustainable commitment across the institution.
——Assessment OF Learning—Summative, judgmental—Involves grading—Places responsibility on instructor—Focuses on programmatic and system accountability—Examples: high stakes testing, unit tests, culminating products—Collaboration: 6th grade plant research project
6th graders scores on the SC PASS science test related to plants showed an increase in test scores from 6th graders the previous year.
SL:
taught steps of Big 6 process;
provided detailed research packet;
provided guidance
——————How to Monitor Learning Growth —Formative, ongoing, reflective

Student and instructor as partners

Pre-assessment
———————Assessing Learning: The Missing Piece in Instruction? —Identify the learning target.—Develop criteria for assessment.—Select an assessment tool.—Design a performance task.—Use the assessment results to improve instruction. ——
Dear Mr. K
We fownd a bug on the sidwok at or school. It is red and black. It has 2 antena and small sqares on the back. Kan you hlp us? We want to no if this bug is dangris and if it pichas and what it can do. Can you tell us its name too?
Mrs. W’s class
—Chart 1: What we know about inquiring (pre)—Chart 2: What we know about inquiring (post)—Learning Logs Wiki —Google Images: Learning Logs ——The Unquiet Librarian on Reflections—Survey Question Focus1.How helpful the school library is with getting information you need2.How helpful the school library is with using the information to complete your school work (lL skills)3.How helpful the school library is with your school work in general (knowledge building, knowledge outcomes)4.How helpful the school library is with using computers in the library, at school, and at home5.How helpful the school library is to you with your general reading interests6.How helpful the school library is to you when you are not at school (independent learning)7.General school aspects –Academic Achievement —What are the ways that you gather evidence of student learning?
(formative or summative)
—Over to you….Padlet:——http://padlet.com/wall/tj8s046eda———How Will I…
Develop a long-range plan for assessing and documenting the impact of my instructional program?
Identify workable assessment strategies;Identify what activities will be assessed and when;Gather and organize evidence;Present/report evidence———Reporting As Advocacy —Evidence Folders/Portfolios—Summary Reports —Charting Your Course
"To make our programs count and to be accountable, we need to take a hard look at the research findings, assess where we are and decide what we need to do.. We can’t wait for someone else to do it for us. We have the academic proof now let’s build the grassroots proof. We need to set some achievable goals, and develop an action plan."
—Advice —Start where you are—Track resources and services—Build partnerships with faculty—Increase collaborations—Integrate ICT skills into units of study—With teachers tackle assessments – develop long-range plan ——Possible contents of evidence folder—Link library’s mission with school’s mission statement.—Connect with school’s learning priorities.—Select samples of instruction to align with school’s priorities.—Possible contents of evidence folder—Provide examples of student work for lessons included.—Display compiled assessment data for lessons selected.—Include samples of student and instructor reflections about progress and improvements.——————Algonquin Middle School (NY) Quarterly Reports —
Mar/Apr 2012 Issue
Q: What is the key to successful coteaching?
—What Is Your Impact?
“School library marketing has to begin and end with impact. It has to be about what we do for our kids, our teachers, our communities and why it's important. It has to be about outcomes and the message that 'we're all in this together' or, put another way, that we care just as much about student success as any other teacher in the building."

—